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Wednesday, November 16, 2022

Volvo Group breaks megawatt hour barrier

 


The electromobility specialist Designwerk (owned by Volvo Group) has become the first manufacturer to launch an all-electric semitrailer tractor with 1000 kilowatt hours (kWh) battery capacity. This represents a new milestone in electromobility for the commercial vehicle industry, in that long-distance and heavy-duty transports are no longer restricted to diesel and hydrogen-powered vehicles. The higher energy efficiency of the electric truck drive outshines the trio of diesel, hydrogen, and synthetic fuel drives by far. This is a clear plus point for e-trucks in a time of energy scarcity. With a battery capacity of one megawatt hour, the vehicle is likely to be particularly appealing to companies in distribution and long-distance logistics. Criteria such as emission-free driving, subsidy measures and a long-term positive cost balance compared to conventional drives are convincing more and more customers from transport logistics of the benefits of electric drive systems.

The speed of change in mobility for commercial vehicles on the road is picking up. The complete system provider Designwerk, which is driving electromobility forward with e-truck range world records, a wide variety of special applications and high-capacity batteries, is now presenting what is to date a unique vehicle: a tractor unit with 1000 kWh battery capacity. No other manufacturer has broken the megawatt-hour barrier so far.

Of the 1000 kWh available, 864 kWh are consumed in daily operation; the remainder is stored in order to extend battery life. With a fully loaded transport, say of 42 tonnes, the vehicle designed by the Swiss e-mobility pioneer can drive for 576 kilometres. Depending on the load and route profile, up to 640 kilometres may be possible.

Designwerk founder and board member Tobias Wülser puts it in a nutshell: “Large capacity batteries make the energy efficiency of electric trucks even more apparent. In this case, our electric vehicle consumes 52 percent less energy than a diesel vehicle.” It is not only from a commercial point of view that the figures favor the e-truck. With an average mileage of 120,000 kilograms per year, the CO2 savings with a Swiss electricity mix are 74 percent over the entire service life of the vehicle.

Above all, customers from the distribution, long-distance transport, heavy and special transport industries will find the Designwerk electric truck to be a genuine replacement for their conventionally powered vehicles. Due to the special positioning of the battery systems behind the cabin and the resulting extension of the chassis by one metre, the vehicle is particularly suitable for use in Switzerland and the Scandinavian countries. The option to charge the vehicle with 350 kW allows it to be used in shifts. The electric truck charges 80% SoC in about 100 minutes.

The built-in high-voltage battery system with NMC technology originate from the company’s own battery manufacturing facility. They stand out due to their modular design and high energy density in a small space when compared to the competition. Designwerk uses them to electrify a wide variety of commercial vehicles.

The 40-tonne truck puts 500 kilowatts (680 hp) of power on the road and drives with the proprietary 1-speed transmission with no gear shifting, no clutch engagement and no jerking. Designwerk offers the vehicle as Mid and High Cab 6x2T. The first vehicles will be seen, but barely heard, on Switzerland’s roads at the end of 2023.

Monday, June 20, 2022

Mercedes-Benz to unveil electric truck with 500 km range

The battery-electric eActros LongHaul long-distance truck will be Mercedes-Benz Trucks’ trade show highlight at this year’s IAA Transportation in September in Hanover.

The manufacturer announced the 40-ton truck in 2020 and presents the “concept prototype” exactly two years later for the first time. The eActros LongHaul to be shown at IAA provides a preview of the design theme of the series-production vehicle. The tractor unit is also part of the eActros LongHaul test fleet.

The first prototypes are already undergoing intensive testing and the eActros LongHaul will be tested on public roads this year. In the coming year, near- production prototypes will got to customers for real-world use testing. Series readiness is planned for 2024. On a single battery charge the eActros LongHaul will have a range of around 500 kilometers. The e-truck will enable high-performance charging – or so-called “megawatt charging.”

Karin Rådström, CEO Mercedes-Benz Trucks: “The electrification of heavy long-distance transport is the next milestone on our road to CO2-neutrality. The eActros LongHaul is a battery-electric vehicle which is planned to be economically feasible for our customers. My team and I look forward to presenting this innovative truck to our customers and the public in September.”

As part of its pre-launch communications for IAA, Mercedes-Benz Trucks published the first teaser images of the eActros LongHaul concept prototype and announced further technical specifications planned for the production vehicle. The batteries used in the eActros LongHaul employ lithium-iron phosphate cell technology (LFP). These are characterized, above all, by a long service life and more usable energy. The batteries can be charged from 20 to 80 percent in well under 30 minutes at a charging station with an output of about one megawatt.

The long range on a single charge in combination with megawatt charging results in overall ranges on a par with conventional trucks and thus enables two-shift operations. The vehicle is also characterized by a particularly well-balanced driveline for a very pleasant driving experience. In addition, the eActros LongHaul features the manufacturer’s numerous safety innovations.

The core of the Mercedes-Benz Trucks concept for battery-electric long-distance transport is to offer customers a holistic solution consisting of vehicle technology, consulting, charging infrastructure and services. The eActros LongHaul should be the right choice for customers in terms of profitability, sustainability and reliability.

The lion’s share of long-distance transport applications in transporters’ operational practices do not require a range beyond the approximately 500 km the eActros LongHaul makes possible on a single charge. In addition, legal restrictions on the driving times for truck drivers limit the need for longer ranges, depending on the case.

For example, truck drivers in the EU must take a minimum of a 45-minute break after a maximum of 4.5 hours of driving. During this time energy for the remaining route can be recharged. The eActros LongHaul is therefore the right choice for transport companies when used regularly on routes that can be planned, given appropriate distances and charging options.



Friday, October 29, 2021

Toyota's first battery EV has 500 km range and a solar roof option

Toyota will offer the bZ4X in front-wheel-drive and all-wheel-drive variants. The former will feature a single 150 kW capable of accelerating the car from zero to 100 kilometers per hour in 8.4 seconds. Per the WLTC standard, the automaker claims the FWD model’s 71.4 kWh battery will allow it to travel approximately 500 kilometers or 310 miles on a single charge.

The battery will support 150 kW DC fast charging, allowing it to go from dead to 80 percent after about 30 minutes of charging. As for the AWD model, it will feature two 80kW motors, one built into each axle, for a total power output of 160 kW. It can accelerate from zero to 100 kilometers per hour in 7.7 seconds. Toyota estimates the ranges of the AWD model at 460 kilometers or 285 miles on a single charge. In both variants, the battery is integrated into the chassis, a design choice the automaker helps lower the SUV’s center of gravity and improve the rigidity of the chassis.

Toyota also plans to equip the bZ4X with some nifty extra features. One of those is a solar roof the automaker says will generate about 1120 miles worth of free power generation. It will also offer a steer-by-wire system that removes the mechanical connection between the steering wheel and front wheels. Both features will be available in select models.

The bZ4X will debut in the US and other markets in mid-2022.

Friday, May 7, 2021

680 hp Electric Rallycross RX1E tested by Andreas Mikkelsen

Powertrain kits for the 2022 World Rallycross electric supercar class will include two 250kW motors, one on each axle, two inverters and a 52.65kWh battery with an innovative cooling system. The power units will develop 500 kW (680 horsepower).

The kit can be retrofitted to existing internal combustion-powered World RX Supercars or built into an all-new chassis.

The electric kits are priced at €300,000 with an additional €100,000 for four years of technical support. The cost is lower than the current Supercar power units over the same period. Performance levels of RX1e will be higher than existing ICE Supercars, with a significant power and torque increase and with a contained weight gain.

Kreisel Electric, the official supplier of the electrification kit to the world championship, is collaborating with GCK Energy, the approved energy supplier. A prototype World RX1e car has already been tested by Kreisel with impressive results.

Having track tested the RX1E powertrain kit installed in a Skoda WRC chassis Andreas Mikkelsen said "It's on another level – absolutely insane"

Philipp Kreisel, managing director of Kreisel Electric, said: "We are very happy to confirm that there is good progress on the World RX1e kit and we are fully on schedule. Despite the COVID-19 crisis and the postponement of the series to 2022 we were able to finalize the design of the performance kit and start testing with the mule-car. Beyond this I would like underline the outstanding collaboration with the FIA who make this ground-breaking project possible.”

The original intention was to introduce full-electric racing to the FIA World Rallycross Championship in 2021. However, following a World Motor Sport Council e-vote in April this year it was decided to delay the implementation until 2022 due to the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has brought about a delay to introducing electrification to the FIA World Rallycross Championship,” said Gyarfas Olah, president of the FIA Off-Road Commission.

“Nonetheless, we are committed to a new, electric future which has as guiding principles cost control and demonstration of the huge power capabilities of full electric road car-based Supercars. Together with Kreisel we are developing a performance package which is sustainable and enables teams to be part of a highly-competitive electric racing series. The fans, who are used to very spectacular races in rallycross, will be thrilled by the acceleration power of the coming RX1e cars.”

Friday, March 12, 2021

Rolls-Royce and Tecnam to deliver an all-electric passenger aircraft in 2026

Rolls-Royce and airframer Tecnam are joining forces with Widerøe – the largest regional airline in Scandinavia, to deliver an all-electric passenger aircraft for the commuter market, ready for revenue service in 2026. The project expands on the successful research programme between Rolls-Royce and Widerøe on sustainable aviation and the existing partnership between Rolls-Royce and Tecnam on powering the all-electric P-Volt aircraft.

Stein Nilsen, Chief Executive, Widerøe said: “Norway’s extensive network of short take-off and landing airports is ideal for zero emissions technologies. This aircraft shows how quickly new technology can and will be developed, and that we are on track with our ambition of flying with zero emissions around 2025.”

Rob Watson, Director – Rolls-Royce Electrical, said: “Electrification will help us deliver our ambition to enable the markets in which we operate achieve net zero carbon by 2050. This collaboration strengthens our existing relationships with Tecnam and Widerøe as we look to explore what is needed to deliver an all-electric passenger aircraft for the commuter market. It also demonstrates Rolls-Royce’s ambitions to be the leading supplier of all-electric and hybrid electric propulsion and power systems across multiple aviation markets.”

The programme will look to cover all elements of developing and delivering an all-electric passenger aircraft that could be used in the Norwegian market from 2026. Due to its topography, Norway makes extensive use of aviation for regional connectivity and has an ambition for all domestic flights to be zero emissions by 2040. Rolls-Royce will bring its expertise in propulsion and power systems, Tecnam will provide aircraft design, manufacturing and certification capabilities. Widerøe’s mission will be to ensure that all competence and requirements of an airline operator are in place for entry into service in 2026.

Andreas Aks, Chief Strategy Officer, Widerøe, added: “We are highly excited to be offered the role as launch operator, but also humble about the challenges of putting the world’s first zero emissions aircraft into service. Our mission is to have all new capabilities, processes and procedures required for a zero emissions operator, designed and approved in parallel with the aircraft being developed and certified.”

Fabio Russo, Chief Project R and D and Product Development, Tecnam, said: “It is incredible to see the interest around the P-Volt, not only coming from regional airlines, but also from smart mobility-based companies. This last year has demonstrated the importance of promoting capillary connections between small communities, while reducing the congestion of the main hubs. The P-Volt, like the P2012 Traveller today, will perfectly fit the scope of this programme. We are honoured and pleased to see the level of enthusiasm Widerøe and our partner Rolls-Royce are dedicating to this project.”

The collaboration offers an opportunity to develop an exciting solution to the commuter aircraft market. Before the pandemic, Widerøe offered around 400 flights per day using a network of 44 airports, where 74% of the flights have distances less than 275 km. The shortest flight durations are between seven and fifteen minutes. Developing all-electric aircraft will enable people to be connected in a sustainable way and will fulfill Wideroe’s ambition to make its first all-electric flight by 2026. The all-electric P-Volt aircraft, which is based on the 11-seat Tecnam P2012 Traveller aircraft is ideal for the short take-off and landing as well as for routes in the North and the West Coast of Norway.

Rolls-Royce and Widerøe announced a joint research programme in 2019. The aim of the programme was to evaluate and develop electrical aircraft concepts that would fulfil the Norwegian ambition of having the first electrified aircraft in ordinary domestic scheduled flights by 2030 and 80% emission reduction in domestic flights by 2040.

Rolls-Royce also has an existing strategic partnership with Tecnam to develop the modified Tecnam P2010 aircraft with the H3PS1 propulsion system, the first parallel hybrid-electric propulsion system for General Aviation started together with Rotax in May 2018.

Monday, January 25, 2021

All-electric 530hp BMW i4 reaches 100 km/h in four seconds

When an ideal balance is called for between dynamics and ride comfort, the BMW 3 Series and 4 Series models consistently set the benchmark within their segments in the premium market. In terms of electrically powered vehicles, the new BMW i4 is set to take on this role very soon. The first purely electrically powered 4-door Gran Coupé enriches locally emission-free mobility with sheer driving pleasure.

“For the first time, we’ve developed a BMW with sporty DNA for purely electric driving entirely from scratch,” explains project manager David Alfredo Ferrufino Camacho. “The BMW i4 offers everything BMW stands for – and it’s fully electric, too.”

A few months prior to its world premiere, the BMW i4 is currently completing the final phase of driving dynamics testing. The focus here is on the integrated application of all drive and suspension components, ensuring that the spontaneous power delivery of the electric motor is combined with precisely controllable handling in every situation, fascinating cornering dynamics, optimised traction in all weather and road conditions and perfectly balanced ride comfort. For the purpose of this fine-tuning process, the BMW Group applies its technological expertise in the areas of drive and suspension drawn from decades of experience. This gives the new BMW i4 a mature premium character and makes for a driving experience that is unique within the competitive environment.

Excitingly calm: sprinting with the BMW i4.

With a maximum output of up to 390 kW/530 hp, the electric powertrain in the BMW i4 enables impressive acceleration manoeuvres: it reaches the 100 km/h mark in just four seconds from standstill. But even more impressive than its pure sprint capacity is the driving response it conveys. A model-specific damper technology reduces the dipping movements of the body at the moment of set-off, while the actuator-related wheel slip limitation (ARB) developed by BMW with its extremely fast and precise control guarantees optimum traction and perfect straight-line stability at all times – even on slippery road surfaces. This makes the catapult-like sprint in the new BMW i4 an experience that is both exciting and carefree, because it is not affected by drive slip or course corrections.

However, fascinating acceleration is only one aspect of the superior performance characteristics that define the BMW i4. Other distinguishing features include its spontaneous reactions to every movement – not just of the accelerator pedal but also of the steering and the brake pedal. The prerequisites for this high level of agility and precision are anchored in the underlying vehicle concept of the BMW i4. This includes the car's long wheelbase, wide track widths, model-specific camber values, large wheels, as well as the high torsional rigidity and the vehicle’s low centre of gravity and weight balance.

Effortless precision: taking the bend on the ideal line.

All these parameters were taken into account in detail in the integrated application of the drive and suspension components so as to ensure hallmark BMW sporty flair in every situation on the road. The design and tuning of the suspension and damping systems consistently ensure optimum road contact. At the same time, the virtually silent drive in combination with the sophisticated suspension technology gives the impression of an effortlessly floating vehicle even at higher speeds, entirely unaffected by bumps in the road or difficult traction conditions.

“The BMW i4 conveys the feeling of being light and agile yet also solid and authoritative,” says project manager David Alfredo Ferrufino Camacho. “With its superior directional reliability and high level of cornering stability, it seems to literally attach itself to the road. All electric vehicles are capable of fast straight-line acceleration. But that’s not enough for us at BMW.”

The BMW i4 is also effortlessly controllable – even in highly dynamic driving situations. In addition to its neutral self-steering behaviour and its powerful, precisely controllable brakes, the steering in the BMW i4 is a major contributing factor here: it responds directly and with a high degree of accuracy, offering the driver precise feedback at all times while remaining entirely independent of drive forces, even during intensive acceleration or deceleration. Lane changes at high speeds are mastered with ease, while relaxed driving over long distances is ensured by the speed-related Servotronic power steering and the fact that the vehicle is largely insusceptible to any disruption caused by road bumps.

Typical BMW: the unique balance between sporty flair and ride comfort.

The distinctive driving dynamics of the BMW i4 derive partly from the fact that its performance characteristics are not achieved at the expense of driving comfort. The purely electrically powered Gran Coupé is characterised by unrestricted suitability for day-to-day use. Fitted with a high-voltage storage system featuring the latest battery cell technology that enables a range of up to 600 kilometres (WLTP), the chassis technology of the BMW i4 is designed for long-distance comfort, too. It is based on the high-quality damper technology, supplemented with model-specific components and separately tuned. This effectively reduces body vibrations due to road unevenness and on bends. The model-specific fine-tuning of the suspension and damping contributes significantly to the harmonious driving characteristics of the BMW i4.

Scania plans to introduce long-distance battery electric trucks.

Scania’s aim is to be the leader in the shift towards a sustainable transport system. Battery electric vehicles will be the main tool to drive this shift and to enable decarbonised transport solutions with better transport economy to customers.

The rapid development of electric solutions for heavy duty vehicles includes the fast advancement of battery technology in respect of energy storage capacity per kg. Charging time, charging cycles and economics per kg are improving rapidly. This means these solutions will become more cost effective, primarily in repetitive and predictable applications. They will gradually overtake Scania’s industry-leading fossil and biofuel powered solutions in most transport applications.

“We see that battery electric solutions are the first zero-tailpipe emission technology to reach market broadly. For the customer, a battery electric vehicle requires less service than a conventional one, meaning higher uptime and improved costs per km or hour of operations. We have learnt from the bus segment where transformation started earlier and battery electric options are in high demand. Scania’s timing in that segment was not optimal, however it provided good experiences and we are presently accelerating with the new Scania bus range. It also gave us good base knowledge as we ramp up the electrified truck business,” says Alexander Vlaskamp, Head of Sales and Marketing at Scania.

The company has already launched a fully electric truck as well as a plug-in hybrid truck. In a few years’ time, Scania plans to introduce long-distance electric trucks that will be able to carry a total weight of 40 tonnes for 4.5 hours, and fast charge during the drivers’ compulsory 45-minute rest.

By 2025, Scania expects that electrified vehicles will account for around 10 percent or our total vehicle sales volumes in Europe and by 2030, 50 percent of our total vehicle sales volumes are expected to be electrified.

Battery electric vs hydrogen Scania has invested in hydrogen technologies and is currently the only heavy-duty vehicle manufacturer with vehicles in operations with customers. The engineers have gained valuable insights from these early tests and efforts will continue. However, going forward the use of hydrogen for such applications will be limited since three times as much renewable electricity is needed to power a hydrogen truck compared to a battery electric truck. A great deal of energy is namely lost in the production, distribution, and conversion back to electricity.

Repair and maintenance also need to be considered. The cost for a hydrogen vehicle will be higher than for a battery electric vehicle as its systems are more complex, such as an extensive air- and cooling system. Furthermore, hydrogen is a volatile gas which requires more maintenance to ensure safety.

However, hydrogen is a promising energy carrier; good way of storing energy over long cycles, and will play an important role in decarbonisation if produced in an environmentally friendly way. Scania looks forward to sourcing fossil free steel for its trucks as hydrogen will play a greater role in several industries.

Stationary fuel cells are an important component of the electric charging system. This solution is especially promising in areas with abundant renewable energy, and in rural areas off the main electricity grid.

“To do what’s best for both our customers total operating economy and our planet, we are not closing the door on any possibilities. It is clear that Scania’s focus in the here-and-now perspective as well as short- term is a combination of renewable fuels and battery electric vehicles. We see that for basically all segments,” Vlaskamp continues.

Committed to more electric products Scania’s science based climate targets will see the company cut CO2 emissions from its own operations by 50 percent by 2025, as well as reduce emissions from the customers’ vehicles by 20 percent during the same period. To fulfil these far reaching targets, Scania’s focus is on well-to-wheel, which is more stringent than many of the legislative regulations coming up which centre on tank-to-wheel.

The company commits to launch at least one new electric product application in the bus and truck segment every year. At the same time, societal investments in a solid infrastructure for battery electric vehicles remains a priority.

“Scania’s focus is our customers’ business. Transport operators must be able to continue performing assignments in a sustainable way at a reasonable cost,” Vlaskamp concludes.

Thursday, January 7, 2021

Volkswagen ID.4 to feature Intelligent Regenerative Braking

Regenerative braking, in other words energy recovery when decelerating, greatly boosts the range of any electric vehicle. However, what should happen when drivers of electric vehicles take their foot off the right-most pedal is a difficult, philosophical question. Should the electric drive motor act as a generator, converting kinetic energy into electrical energy, or should it run without generating electrical energy, so that the vehicle’s momentum is used for coasting?

The answers to these questions vary greatly depending on the manufacturer and model. Some electric vehicles recover energy whenever a driver lifts off the right-most pedal after acceleration. In the case of the new ID.4 electric compact SUV, Volkswagen opted for a different strategy: coasting takes priority because conversion of energy inevitably leads to losses. This applies to the D (Drive) position, the default mode, which is automatically activated upon start-up.

The coasting function, whereby drivers take their foot off the accelerator pedal early on, makes for relaxed and predictable driving. Should drivers want to decelerate more, they step on the brake pedal and activate brake energy recuperation. During the majority of everyday braking maneuvers—up to around 0.25 g of deceleration—the electric drive motor performs the braking alone, while the electric brake servo only activates the friction brakes in situations that demand more stopping power. The transition from generator-based to hydraulic braking goes almost unnoticed, thanks to highly accurate and swift brake and drive system control. These systems also make sure that the rear wheels, where brake energy recuperation takes place, always have a sufficient amount of grip.

Each ID.4 features predictive Eco Assistance as standard. It analyzes data from the navigation system and vehicle sensors to provide drivers with effective support in driving efficiently and in a relaxed way. Once the ID.4 approaches a low-speed area, such as urban environments, junctions and bends, Eco Assistance notifies drivers to take their foot off the accelerator pedal. From this moment on, the system manages optimum coasting and energy recovery without drivers having to intervene. The car responds similarly when it approaches a vehicle ahead that is travelling at a lower speed.

Drivers can use the gear selector rocker switch to change from the D position to B (Brake) at any time. In this mode, the ID.4’s drive almost always recovers energy during lifting off, but not all the way to a standstill. The limit has been set at 0.13 g—enough for clearly noticeable deceleration that won’t confuse drivers of conventional internal combustion engine vehicles: intuitive operation is one of the vehicles’ greatest strengths.

The ID.4 is Volkswagen’s first all-electric SUV and the brand’s first electric world car. It offers sporty yet comfortable driving, a spacious interior and cutting-edge controls, displays, infotainment and assist systems. At launch in the U.S., the vehicle will be offered with an 82kWh (gross) battery and a rear-mounted AC permanent-magnet synchronous motor with 201 horsepower, 228 pound-feet of torque and an EPA-estimated 250 miles of range. A powerful, electric all-wheel-drive variant with 302 hp will follow later in 2021.

Tuesday, September 15, 2020

Scania launches fully electric truck with 250 km range

Scania now launches its first fully electric truck. With a range of up to 250 km, the Scania electric truck can operate during the whole day and still return safely to its home depot for overnight charging. If there is a need for an extended range, the driver can fast charge the truck over a break or during natural stops in operation.

The truck is available with the option of either five, for a total of 165 kWh, or nine batteries totalling 300 kWh installed capacity. With five batteries the range is 130 km. The range is, of course, dependent on the weight, body type and topography.

With the combustion engine removed, space for batteries has been freed. Additional batteries are mounted on the chassis frame. The new electric motor delivers a continuous power of 230 kW or approximately 310 hp. The motor has two gears to provide high power over a wider speed span, thereby improving comfort.

One of the major benefits with an electric motor compared with combustion engine is its high controllability. In practice, the customer will experience this through faster acceleration and response from the powertrain.

Other components needed for fully electric propulsion, such as battery management units, battery cooling components, electrohydraulic steering system, electric air compressor and inverter are also mounted along the chassis frame.

Scania’s battery electric truck comes equipped with a CCS charging connector to charge from the electric grid. With 130 kW DC charging, the five battery packs will be charged in less than 55 minutes and the nine batteries in less than 100 minutes. The truck can also be charged through regenerative braking.

Scania’s new truck is equipped for a fully electric power take off. Instead of connecting auxiliaries to the interface that is usually located on the gearbox or engine, it is instead connected to an electrical connection box, called a DC box mounted on the chassis. This gives a DC link of up to 60 kW PTO for body auxiliaries such as refrigeration systems and hooklifts.The Scania electric truck is available with the L- and P-series cab, both of which are designed for urban operations. The low-floor L-series cab, particularly, is purpose-designed for congested city conditions with unrivalled visibility.

“Sustainable emission-free transport is an increasing requirement for transport companies,” says Anders Lampinen, Director, New Technologies. “Acquiring an electric truck is not just an investment in the customer’s fleet, but also in its brand and market. The electric truck enables the customer to stay ahead of the competition, learn about infrastructural challenges and start adapting for the future.”

Friday, September 4, 2020

New FIA World Rallycross Project E race series has run it's first race in Sweden

The new FIA World Rallycross Project E race series has run it's first support race in Sweden,

Ken Block's Ford Fiesta ERX won this breakthrough event at the famous Holjes rallycross circuit in front of two identical Fords.

Built by Austrian firm STARD, the cars boast three electric motors, producing 600 horsepower and 1,000 Nm of torque combined. It can go from zero to 100km/h in 1.8 seconds, according to the race team, with a top speed of 240km/h. Each axle gets its own 2-speed transmission, although only one gear is used in races. Brake and torque bias is adjustable front to rear but the STARD powertrain does not have AWD torque vectoring.